ALBUM REVIEW: David Corley – “Available Light”

If you grab a copy of NUVO Newsweekly this week you’ll see my 900-word interview with David Corley, a Hoosier songwriter whose work has gestated through three decades of musical, cultural and personal exploration. Available Light is one of those rare albums which arrives fully formed, as though Corley has recorded dozens of albums we just haven’t had the opportunity to hear, this being the best of the bunch.

The truth, however, is much more interesting, as is every song on the album. “Pink clouds, the sun comes like a rocket up to the edge of the horizon,” he sings at the album’s start, echoing the arrival of this music itself, a raw, beautiful example of how influential music can be when given the time to open up and develop. Echoing Swordfishtrombone-era Tom Waits and more modern acoustic folk from the likes of Alexi Murdoch, Corley has crafted what he calls an EP, but which is truly much more — thirty years of a man’s life condensed into an hour of music you’ll relive for years to come.

From the NUVO interview:

“To me, music is very magical when I write it,” he explains. “When I listen to something, there’s a certain thread that runs through the song where you can just feel when an artist means it. I have two rules about writing a song: one is you better have something to say, and the other is you better have something to say. That’s all I have.”

That level of technicolor realism is what makes Available Light more than just an amazing album. Shooting his life with the available light of a wide range of experiences, Corley does the impossible, allowing us to fully see those experiences and then transpose them over our own lives like one of those projector-slides from high school. Layers upon layers, these songs certainly have more than enough to say to keep listeners coming back time and again. And if this is the only thing we ever hear from Corley, as disheartening as that might be, we’ll still have the ultimate debut album.

I don’t, however, think this will be the last we hear from David Corley. And neither should you.

THE LIVE WIRE: The Murder Junkies coming to Indy’s 5th Quarter Lounge in June!

If you’ve ever said there’s nothing hardcore going on in Indianapolis, prepare to have those words force-fed down your throats by the band that all but defines the raw brutality of the punk aesthetic. That’s right — the Murder Junkies, the final band to back the late, quite possibly certifiably insane, punk legend G.G. Allin will be coming to Indianapolis to play the 5th Quarter Lounge on June 13, with support from Late August, ASD, Hell’s Orphans and Giraffes Eating Lions. Brought to you by Dan Nash and Circle Pit Conservative in cooperation with Mona DeMaggio at the 5th Quarter, this looks to be THE SHOW this summer, one you won’t want to miss if you have ever claimed to support punk rock and free speech. I’ll bring you more information on this show as things develop, but tickets are available now for $8.00, or $10.00 at the door (if they’re not sold out by then).

BEFORE I LOSE CONTROL: Lebanese performer Jay Wud is the best guitarist you haven’t heard

It only takes a single listen to Jay Wud’s single “Low” to know you’re listening to someone who knows his modern rock music, someone who should be better known here in the U.S. than he is. The Lebanese singer-songwriter, based in Dubai, has worked regularly with producer Howard Benson (Motorhead, My Chemical Romance) and has been influenced by the likes of Steve Vai and the Foo Fighters. He’s toured the world supporting Guns ‘n’ Roses and Aerosmith, building a reputation for being a versatile guitar presence with electrifying vocals and the stage presence to draw in even the most jaded fan. “Low” is centrally featured on an upcoming EP which he hopes will introduce him to American audiences.

Check out a live video below of “Masquerade” which features Malikah, known as the Queen of Arabic hip-hop. To learn more about Jay Wud, check out his official website and Facebook page.

ARTISTS TO WATCH: JEFF The Brotherhood

Nashville rockers JEFF The Brotherhood are ready at last to release their follow-up to 2012’s Hypnotic Nights! Whether the three-year wait was worth it remains to be heard, since as of yet the only new track I’ve heard is “What’s A Creep” (posted below). But the new album Wasted On The Dream was co-produced by Jake and Jamin Orrall with Joe Chiccarelli, who has produced many of my favorite records including the Raconteurs’ Consolers of the Lonely and the White Stripes’ Icky Thump, as well as several classic albums from seminal Mexican garage band Cafe Tacuba. So I have high confidence that this album is going to have more than enough raw rock to get people excited about the state of 2015’s new music. As the band states in a recent press release:

Wasted on the Dream is the first JEFF The Brotherhood album to showcase the band’s recent evolution into a full-blown ROCK outfit: Jake plays six-string guitar (as opposed to his custom-made signature 3-string model), Jamin plays a full kit and Jack Lawrence (of Dead Weather and Raconteurs fame) plays bass on the entire album. The album also features guest contributions from Bethany Cosentino of Best Coast, Diarrhea Planet guitarists Evan Bird and Emmett Miller, and a flute solo by Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull. To accommodate their bigger sound live, JEFF has expanded to a highly voluminous, balls-out twin guitar monster of a quartet.

The album drops March 10th, and will include the following tracks:

  1. Voyage Into Dream
  2. Black Cherry Pie
  3. Cosmic Visions
  4. Mystified Minds
  5. Melting Place
  6. In My Dreams
  7. In My Mouth
  8. Karaoke, TN
  9. Coat Check Girl
  10. What’s A Creep
  11. Prairie Song

INTERVIEW: R’lyeh

R'lyeh live at the 5th Quarter Lounge in Indianapolis. (Credit: Jonathan Sanders)

R’lyeh live at the 5th Quarter Lounge in Indianapolis. (Credit: Jonathan Sanders)

If you’re interested in hearing metal in the vein of Bongripper, Pelican and ISIS, you’re going to love Indianapolis-based R’lyeh. Inspired by the work of H.P. Lovecraft without necessarily being a “Lovecraft band,” the duo strives to push the envelope of what progressive instrumental metal can be, even as they deal with the changes required by becoming a two-member band following the loss of bassist Joshua Buchanan. I caught the band after their set at the 5th Quarter Lounge in Indianapolis to talk about the benefits of instrumental metal, the work they have done on upcoming debut album Color Out Of Space (due out this February) and what it is like being part of such a close-knit metal scene.

You can hear a sample from their upcoming album’s title track, shot live at the venue, below. The band will be playing Jiminy Christmas at the Emerson Theater on December 14th with half a dozen other bands to benefit Riley Children’s Hospital — $6 gets you in, or you can bring a new unwrapped toy!

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First off, who would you say are your biggest influences, and how do they play into your sound?

We’re extremely influenced by a vast array of bands, everything from led zeppelin to AHAB, even bands like This Will Destroy You. We are heavily influenced by the whole post-(genre) scene: We really dig instrumental music. It forces the listener to really listen to the music, which is why we’re all here right?

We’ve been compared to bands like Bongripper, Pelican, ISIS … the good stuff. Those bands have played heavily into our sound, technically speaking and from a writing standpoint. It’s really only shifted into a more-rounded “thing” when we became a two member band, for we started as two. So the only thing now is filling empty spaces while maintaining a high-intensity stage performance to keep ‘em on their toes!

The whole thing about R’lyeh is that we tell you a story. Our songs on our upcoming release Color Out Of Space are written and arranged in a fashion that represents the “rise and the fall” of all mankind. We build things (riffs) up so big to a point that we’re unable to maintain it, then we fucking destroy things (riffs) all the way down to the ground. You’ll hear us when you see us, you’ll feel us when you feel us, basically.

R'lyeh Live at the 5th Quarter Lounge in Indianapolis. They're just guitar and drums, but so much sound! (Credit: Jonathan Sanders)

R’lyeh Live at the 5th Quarter Lounge in Indianapolis. They’re just guitar and drums, but so much sound! (Credit: Jonathan Sanders)

Do you prefer writing in the studio, or working songs out with an audience? There’s certainly more at stake on stage, but does that give you more creative energy to take risks?

We write primarily at “the R’lair” (the basement of the Indy Indie Artist’s Colony: Thanks y’all for listening every week!) and we’ll run through things until we’re either really comfortable with the song or really hyped on the song and can’t hold it in. Kind of like the very last song we played last night at The Fifth Quarter Lounge, appropriately titled “November.”

Ideally we’d like to have a drum structure to follow, and nail the loops. We allow ourselves ample room for improvisation if needed, just in case. The creativity shows; every performance is different and personal.

Lovecraft inspired the name … Is it difficult to tell those epic stories with just the music? Is there a rush when fans get it?

Yes! R’lyeh (pronounced like Princess Leah, with a “ruhh” in front of it) is Lovecraft inspired, brought about by drummer Mathias (aka Dane, since it’s easier to say) and it was pondered on for a couple of weeks before we decided on the name “RLYEH,” though we aren’t really a “Lovecraft band.” We’re just a couple of dudes who like to get stoned and play some riffs really loud.

Sometimes it is difficult, yes, to tell such an epic tale though it almost just comes to us. I mean our longest song (“Untitled”) is roughly a 10 minute long build-up, and was written in just a couple of hours! It’s all about the jams and see what happens. When people come at me with the Lovecraft reference and actually “get” what we’re doing … what a great feeling.

What, to your ears, makes a perfect song? How do you know when you’ve gotten it right?

The perfect song (to me, Anthony) is when I can feel it more than I can hear it. If a song that I hear in my ears from the radio or the stage or wherever, if that song can make me feel something, than its a winner. I’m going to have to knock it up and wife it.

What song do you wish you’d written?

I wish I would have written “Down in Mexico” by The Coasters. R’lyeh Secret: We do a Black Sabbath cover, but only once so far, with someone else not in the band on vocals.

Is there anything you wish someone would ask you but they never do?

I wish someone would ask me if I wanted to do a shot and take a picture. Life’s too short, man.

Is there anything you wish they’d never ask again?

I wish they would quit asking us why we don’t have a singer.

R'lyeh guitarist Anthony Hampton. (Credit: Jonathan Sanders)

R’lyeh guitarist Anthony Hampton. (Credit: Jonathan Sanders)

Do you have any great “fan” stories about other bands, or about your fans?

I’m fortunate enough that some of my biggest fans are my best friends. And that probably goes both ways, the scene here is pretty close knit. Mona Demaggio [who runs the 5th Quarter Lounge] likes to get on stage with me while I riff. A girl pulled her boobs out and put them in my face once at a Burn the Army show. Honestly man, we could do a whole other interview on interesting stories from shows! [Laughs.]

Have there been any really memorable show disasters?

We’ve forgotten gear before, had to go back for it or borrow another bands. Ohlm got a flat tire and couldn’t make it once, that was rough. We had to cancel our show with Ringworm at Iron Borne Fest because I double-booked myself for a tattoo convention the same weekend. So many little things that always seemed to domino themselves into mega disasters. But we tend to work through the kinks pretty damn easily.

What was your recording experience on the album due this February? What should fans expect from the new album?

Color Out Of Space is the ride through the shit storm that is life. The buildup, the hype, the power, the greed all leads to the breakdown, the chaos, the destruction. You’ll hear riffs, you’ll follow along, you’ll feel relatable feelings and you’ll see the creativity and thoughts involved in putting this band together. We’ve had rough ups and downs along the way but the journey has been great. Expect a lot out of R’lyeh in 2015. We’re going to try and make this an actual thing, who knows where we’ll end up or when, but we’ll be sure to let you know.

THE LIVE WIRE: Burn The Army

Burn The Army live at the 5th Quarter (credit: Jonathan Sanders)

Burn The Army live at the 5th Quarter (credit: Jonathan Sanders)

It has been a full twenty-four hours and I am just now technically getting all my hearing back after the blazing firestorm Indianapolis’s own Burn The Army set loose at 5th Quarter Lounge. For three guys playing mostly instrumental metal, there’s no discounting how hard they worked out there to keep the crowd in a frenzy. Extra credit is due to their drummer, described by other band members as “a prodigy,” who was a whirling dervish out there, proving there’s no need for a gigantic 30-piece kit for a drummer to really pull out all the stops. He has to be seen and heard to be believed. Which you can do, by checking out their new song “Eidolon,” which they debuted, and we captured in HD, last night!

INTERVIEW: Cabin Pressure

Cabin Pressure, live at the 5th Quarter Lounge (credit: Jonathan Sanders)

Cabin Pressure, live at the 5th Quarter Lounge (credit: Jonathan Sanders)

Indianapolis’s Cabin Pressure talks to “Hear! Hear!” Music’s Jonathan Sanders about their new lineup, their songwriting process, and how even when you get back into playing live after a ten year absense (we’re talking ’bout you, Joe Enger!) sometimes it’s more like you never left.

Cabin Pressure is:

Aaron Hiatt – Vocals
Joe Enger – Guitars, Vocals
Jeff Derby – Drums
Kevin Snyder – Bass

They’re unsigned and working on a new album with their brand-new lineup! Look for an announcement about a CD release extravaganza coming to a venue near you in 2015. You can read more about them here, if you missed our recent article about the band’s live set at the 5th Quarter Lounge last week!