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“HEAR! HEAR!” EXCLUSIVE: Hurrah! A Bolt of Light – “In Over My Head”

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Brooklyn’s Hurrah! A Bolt of Light! brings a sensational blend of U2 arena rock and Augustana-inspired pop to the table via the entirety of their self-titled debut album, due out April 1st. The band spent time with producer John Fields (Switchfoot, Soul Asylum, The Rembrandts) in Los Angeles working to get the sound right, and I’ll come out and say it: there’s not a dud on the album.

“In Over My Head” in particular is a shining example of what the band offers. “I keep my heart in a little box … I should have known there’d be hell to pay,” Will Farr sings, backed by shimmering guitars, thundering percussion and echoing hand-clap fueled backing vocals. And while he may feel as though he’s in over his head, listeners will fall head-over-heels as they sing along with this perfectly radio-ready nugget.

Help break this band wide and share the track now, available to stream and download exclusively at “Hear! Hear!” via the above link. It’s easy to say there’s nothing great making it to radio but it’s another thing entirely to sit back and let something this good slip away. (You can follow Hurrah! A Bolt of Light! on Facebook and Twitter.)

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“HEAR! HEAR!” EXCLUSIVE: PAZ’s “The Silence” is golden, an EDM hit in the making

There’s nothing about this song lyrically that would typically draw me in, but the hook to “The Silence” is immediate and I could legitimately expect to hear PAZ’s latest played on radio stations in the same mix as Imagine Dragons, Skrillex and Avicii, something which should attest to its EDM bona-fides. In the end the hook is all that matters, and it will have you singing along mindlessly long before you have the inkling to think about what you’re singing. That’s the essence of a great pop song, one which grabs hold and drags you kicking and screaming into liking it, and then getting you to spread the word even when you know you’ll be tempted to attach “guilty pleasure” to the description.

“Hear! Hear” is excited to be the first place you’ll hear “The Silence,” which you can stream via Soundcloud below. When more information is available about the full mixtape, we’ll let you know here as well.


Tom Levin’s “Pull Yourself Together” melds sly folk with pseudo southern gospel for real keeper

Like a twisted blend of Cracker, Tom Waits and Jason Isbell filtered through the sensibility of the Coens’ Fargo, Swedish artist Tom Levin defies the “sanctity” of genres with this riot of a single off his latest album Them Feet. Hell, even Levin hints that this is his version of “Minnesota Nice,” twisted through a wondrous sludge of psuedo-Southern Folk and gothic Gospel touches. Says Levin:

The lyrics to “Pull Yourself Together” are inspired by how people in the [American South] are very good at letting someone know, in a polite way, when they are behaving like an idiot. I wrote the song because I had to get my disappointment with certain peoples’ behavior out of my system. “Bless your little heart” takes the edge off almost any insult and sometimes makes it sound like a compliment. If you or anyone you know ever needs to tell someone they are being a total jackass.just send them this song.

Watch it below and make your night just a little more special!


NEW MUSIC MONDAY: Schizophrenic melodies, synths unite adventurous singles from Ninetails, Arum Rae and Sleep Thieves

Ninetails – “An Aria”
Album: Quiet Confidence
Release Date: March 10, 2014

A trippy exercise in merging a dense yet adventurously free-wheeling arrangement, this second single from Ninetails’ upcoming album Quiet Confidence showcases a band with music perfect for close headphone listening. The vocals hide hauntingly out of reach, as the ears focus on the ornately schizophrenic melody, with bells and horns competing amid a constantly shifting aural backdrop. Definitely music worth savoring.

Arum Rae – “2001”
Album: Warranted Queen EP
Release Date: April 22, 2014

The backdrop of this endlessly addictive single which Spin dubbed “Auto-Tuned soul” is awash in synths and electronic dub elements, but Arum Rae’s distinct vocals delve into 808s and Heartbreak-esque territory while making subtle shifts which belie her advanced study of jazz vocals at Boston’s Berklee College of Music. What sets the song apart is that constant shifting between the worlds of hip-hop, pop and electronic, with a minimal use of instruments allowing Arum Rae’s voice to really twist and turn. There are moments where her voice, heard through this chaotic prism, takes on a vaguely middle-eastern touch, as though blending human voice and synth strings.

Sleep Thieves – “City Of Hearts”
Album: You Want The Night
Release Date: Spring 2014

The intro at first sounds like come of Enya’s more twisted synth tracks, but once the drums kick in this single quickly falls into a groove more akin to the sound of the Knife, as filtered through the more poppy nature of early Tegan and Sara. It’s a sound both modern and retro, which is sure to give Sleep Thieves plenty of potential appeal. Their debut You Want The Night, which as a full-length follows their successful 2012 EP Islands, is due out this spring and should quickly assert the Dublin band’s global status among synth-pop taste-makers. It doesn’t hurt that the song is instantly ear-catching and repeatable, which makes you want to blast it from your speakers to anyone who will listen.

 

 

 


FEATURED SONG: Nikki Lerner – “Plea”

Nikki Lerner’s entire album Longings is well worth your listen, but if you’ve only got time for one song, try the subtle building “Plea,” which showcases her pop-meets-jazz leanings in full-on glory. This is an example of a song taking its time to earn a listener’s respect, building layer upon layer of melody as Lerner’s vocals swim among the notes, elevating them from mere pop to something significantly more. This is mournful blues, soaring pop and multi-textured jazz all rolled into one five minute track, something you have to hear again and again to fully absorb. From the pizzicato strings at the first chorus, which immediately make the hairs on the neck stand alert, to the background vocals which add depth and clarity to the melody, this is a song built upon attention to detail. Every detail brings you back. By the time the song builds to its apex — “Please forgive me!” lingering in the air over thundering toms and an epic string instrumental provided by jazz violinist Zach Brock, there’s no going back.

You can buy the album via her Bandcamp page.


FEATURED SONG: Terese Taylor’s “Briefcase” a scathing indictment of love gone awry

I’ve got to say, I like the sound Terese Taylor brings to the table, a biting combination of anti-Lilith nineties post-grunge that references PJ Harvey and Liz Phair, with just as much appreciation for bands like Veruca Salt sneaking out through the lines. “If I ever wanted to be true I’m sure it wouldn’t be to you,” she all but snarls on the chorus of “Briefcase,” emphasizing an inherent distaste for truth-telling in a situation where both sides are hiding plenty in the shadows. This isn’t the easy pop breeze look at love on the rocks, where a well-placed apology will fix everything. This is more akin to the blind leading the blind. “I’m lying to myself and everybody else,” she sings, and the strident guitars and fuzzed-out bass are unobtrusive enough to let Taylor’s understated vocals take the lead. This is a keeper — At Your Mercy Circuit, out in April, has officially jumped onto my “must hear” list.


Kat Dahlia’s “Crazy” proves it: She is THE best thing in pop music.

Is it crazy that it only took one listen to this song and I fell in love?
Is it crazy that I know all the words and I can’t help but sing along?
Fuck no it’s not crazy ….

One listen and you’ll understand. Kat Dahlia is for real, and she’s coming to take control of your earphones.


Andrew Ripp keeps it Simple with acoustic version of album, plus cover of Timberlake’s “Mirrors”

Those who have followed this site for any length of time know I’m a big fan of Andrew Ripp’s music. This interview from 2010 is a must-read, and if you haven’t heard She Remains The Same or his latest effort Won’t Let Go, you need to rectify that situation. Why not start with Simple, which reworks the entirety of Won’t Let Go acoustically, with the addition of this exceptional cover of Justin Timberlake’s “Mirrors”?

Ripp strips the song down to its basics, opening with a piano melody which in its rawest form sounds virtually McCartney-esque. He then builds to create something which shows an appreciation for Timberlake’s original groove while becoming his own fresh take on the pop smash. From there it’s equally easy to imagine him doing the same kind of work on classics-in-the-making like “Cool Ya (Nobody Loves You Like I Do)” or the beautiful “Rescue Me,” which, on the original album, featured Vince Gill on guest vocals.

Andrew Ripp clearly is the real deal, as album after album he continues to rip up the pop-rock playbook. Thank God it’s not even close to being too late to get in on the game. Give it a listen and sound off in the comments section below … can’t wait to hear from you!


Lea Michele overacts as her new single “Cannonball” sinks hook-less, like a stone

“I’ll fly like a cannonball,” Glee-alum Lea Michele sings on her first original single, but what goes up eventually must also come down in a gory explosion of pyrotechnic overkill. At least that’s what happens here in a single which explodes in all the wrong ways, something only Michael Bay could fully appreciate.

Akin to something from a bad Broadway rock musical, Michele overacts her way through the video, backed by her own overwrought vocals, verses and chorus merging into one dense morass of pop miscalculation. The basic message is this: I’m lonely inside, but I’m going to get out there once I light this fuse and live my life, today … today … today …” Michele repeats words and phrases as though beating us with a blunt rhetorical instrument will make us like this song even in the slightest.

I in turn will start living today, and my first step will be vowing never to play this song again. If you’re feeling particularly masochistic, you can press play on the video below and then make the same vow never to do so again. But don’t say I didn’t warn you!


LOVE ME BETTER: Kat Dahlia’s “The High” as visually arresting a video as the song is unforgettable

From a pure pop standpoint, Kat Dahlia’s new single “The High” is both invigorating and unabashedly ear-catching. The video she’s crafted for the song, a five-minute intense look at a violent relationship come to a brutal conclusion, is as visually arresting as the song is undeniably a hit in the making.

The single, off the 22-year-old’s latest mix-tape Seeds, is one of those graphic and brutally honest videos you have to see to believe. Even when the video at times seems on the verge of falling into Twilight territory, the song remains there in all its intense, stutter-pop glory to keep drawing you in.

“You say you’re gonna love me better,” she sings mournfully, but there’s no glossing over it. “But for now and for forever it’s a lie.” This is love in vain, even when it does make for visually and aurally invigorating art. The underlying pain of her experience is brutally evident. Consider this 2014′s first monster hit in the making and a must-hear.


ARMED THROUGH TRUTH: Calle 13′s “Multi-Viral” a call-to-arms in a disinformation age

Not every band has the balls of Puerto Rico’s Calle 13. Most bands don’t come close.

But it takes a special brand of righteous courage to get out there with a message this intense, packaging an ear-catching blend of incendiary rock with a message of moral certainty in an age where we often can’t trust anyone, particularly media gatekeepers. Yet they don’t stop there. The song is built around multiple languages, featuring Rage Against The Machine guitarist Tom Morello and Palestinian singer Kamilya Jubran, and even with barely a rudimentary understanding of the Spanish language (and no understanding of Palestinian) the underlying message comes through loud and clear.

From NPR:

Speaking to the group’s lead singer, Rene Perez Joglar, on the phone recently, he told me the goal of the song was to discuss how “media is controlling everything, even people’s minds, everything. Here in the U.S. it’s worse, it’s like a bubble … It’s important to have the right information, and you are not going to get that from one newspaper or one TV show. You have to look for that. In order to get the full picture, you have to read a lot and look for yourself. Otherwise you’ll find yourself in a war that you think is a good idea, but it’s not for a good reason.”

If you’re still hiding within that media-protected bubble prior to listening to “Multi-Viral,” prepare to have it burst spectacularly.

Calle 13 has proved through the last decade to be the most daring Puerto Rican band of its generation in any genre, and this single proves they’ve got no plans to give up the fight. From the assassination of Puerto Rican independence activist Filiberto Ojeda Rios by the FBI to their vitriol toward the Vatican, nothing’s off limits. Still, there’s always the understanding that there’s more to the band than simply pushing limits. As Alejandro A. Riera writes on his blog culturebodega:

You could tell there was something special about Calle 13. Here was a lyricist/vocalist (René Pérez Joglar “Residente”) who could actually rhyme (unlike so many reggaetón stars) and could use the tools of poetry to create vivid images in the listener’s imagination, and a musician (Eduardo Cabra “Visitante”) who is as much a musical omnivore as David Byrne.

Yes, the band has graduated well beyond the shock-rap which built their reputation early (see “Atrevete Te Te”) and picked up the mantle of righteous indignation laid down years ago by Zach de la Rocha. And those who appreciate protest music where the message and the music are equally worth hearing — and sharing — would be remiss if they ignore the music of Calle 13.

Indeed “Multi-Viral” deserves to become precisely that.


DREAMS UNDETERRED — Jabee’s “Dreams” a thoughtful example of hip-hop at its zenith

Quietly putting Oklahoma City on the hip-hop map, Jabee’s “Dreams,” at the heart and soul of his album Everything Was Beautiful and Nothing Hurt, which is an example of meaningful hip-hop at its zenith. Chuck D of Public Enemy can already be counted as a supporter, suggesting that Jabee’s subtle thoughtful hip-hop has the distinct potential to change the world. “Dreams” in particular focuses on the dreams we all share, big and small, and the ability we have to overcome circumstances to ensure they become realized, not deferred or deterred. Give this one a listen, I think you’ll agree this is a message worth sharing.


Eddie Brnabic’s Subtle Realms a fantastically trippy excursion into instrumental rock

For those among us who appreciate the incendiary goodness of an electric guitar soloist fully unleashed, what Eddie Brnabic does with his album Subtle Realms is positively buzzworthy, particularly on “Transcendental Wine,” an intense throwdown which illustrates his ability to trip with ease between full-throttle rock and raw oozing funk. This is instrumental music built custom for the headphone treatment, and it’s worth every effort to listen to while avoiding all other distractions. Keep an ear toward this kid — you’ll hear much more from him when this album takes off. You can stream the entire album via his Bandcamp page.


Angela Perley and the Howlin’ Moons’ “Hurricane” hits with the full force of a band worth knowing

With the pop kick of Rilo Kiley coupled with the hooks of Kasey Musgraves and Lindi Ortega,l Angela Perley and the Howlin’ Moons hit like a full-on tropical wave with Hey Kid and lead single “Hurricane.” This is the music you should play to friends who say there’s nothing country music can offer, while also bolstering the hooks which could fuel pop-country radio if they focused on musicians with the chops to play to classic and modern influences. Clearly these tracks showcase an artist who’s at home as a cultural observer:

Growing up in small town Ohio, Perley spent years as an observant wallflower engrossing herself in poetry, literature, people, and films. “I am a storyteller at heart, always have been. I get a lot of inspiration from relationships, surroundings, poetry, and old movies. Music for me is a way to express feelings I can’t get out any other way, and when I hit the stage with the band I can turn up and let go.”

The album officially comes out January 21st, and features more than just the single, including “Athens” and “George Stone” which help front-load the listening experience with material worthy of consistent repetition. But “Hurricane” definitely sums up the band’s sound, giving the “something real” she seems to honestly feel straight down to the bone. “You and I you know we are the same,” she howls early in the proceedings as crunchy lead guitar and thundering percussion provide a backdrop as intense as the storm in her heart. The chorus of “whoah whoahs” and stacatto “ha”s further showcases the Rilo Kiley influence, reiterating just how much of an earworm this song is.

Check it out below and then visit the band’s official website to ensure you get your copy the day of release. This isn’t an album you’ll want to miss, as these Howlin’ Moons are ones you’ll want to revel beneath well into 2014.


MELLOW GOLD: Slippertails’ There’s A Disturbing Trend sludge-rocks its way into your soul

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Si, soy un perdedor, but I’m loving how much fun Slippertails are making out of my eternal nostalgia for early-90s alt-sludge.

These New Jersey-ites have soaked in everything that made Beck’s Mellow Gold and Nirvana’s Bleach so mind-bendingly addictive and they’ve put it through a punk-rock blender, creating a photocopy of their own “Garden State of Mind.” However you look at it, songs like “Hip New Jerk” require one to immediately forego the headphone treatment, instead blasting these sludgy, instantly deep-grooving tracks to the masses, demanding they pay attention.

You can stream the entire album now on the band’s Bandcamp page, and you should do so quickly, for There’s A Disturbing Trend serves to showcase just how good modern alternative music can be when you forget about trends altogether and simply rock. Now that’s a novel idea!


“Hell Yeah, Fuck Your Life” — Chi City puts the viral in underground hip-hop

Press play on this one by Southside Chicago rapper Chi City and let the incredible beat reel you in. One listen and I’m ready to share with the world, while blasting the chorus to everyone in earshot: “Hell yeah, fuck ya life!” Though hard-edged, the message is clear. You want riches, fame and respect? Work like a dog for it, put in the time and then maybe you’ll hit on something that sticks. Until then, don’t expect Chi City to cry any tears for you. The track’s got all the hooks needed to worm its way into any hip-hop playlist and stay there. Can’t wait to hear what else these guys come up with in the new year.


FRESH FRIDAY: Chris Clarke’s “Beads” equals shiny, ephemeral pop-hop you’ll want to share

Beads
Great name for chicks
I know a jealous sapphire
And an amethyst
And if she’s a square
I can work with her
But I prefer my joints to be circular

This one’s not to be taken too seriously, but damned if it won’t stick in your head, the ultimate pop-hop throwback. All you need’s a phat beat, some shiny beads, plenty of Snoop Dogg-sized blunts and you’re ready for what Chris Clarke brings to the table. “Every time you see me I got some fresh-assed clothes and some beads. And some weed,” he raps early on, before seriously breaking it all down for us: “I got rare beads, prayer beads, square beads and player beads.”

Word.

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Download “Beads” for free here. Or check out the entire album on his Bandcamp page.


Australian hip-hopper Dialekt’s “Fortress” is a perfect swing for the pop-radio fences

Australian hip-hopper Dialekt has a lot going for him, particularly on his solid single “Fortress.” First off there’s the hook, which echoes but doesn’t carbon-copy the piano-tinged flair of “Love The Way You Lie” by Eminem and Rihanna. Then there’s the chorus, sung ably by Xy Latu, which is as memorable as anything you’ll hear from Mikky Ekko or Gotye, a perfect ear-worm which does as much to demand repeat plays as does Dialekt’s rapping. That’s the clincher, though, is that this kid has serious flow. At first I wasn’t convinced — the first verse sounded a bit too much like B.o.B.’s work on “Airplanes” — but when he really gets going during the second verse, it is immediately clear there’s more here in the vein of Macklemore than anything else in pop-versed hip-hop.

No guarantee he’ll hook our ears with anything else, but “Fortress” is a solid first swing toward the fences. I could hear this song getting plenty of top 40 radio-play, and the video’s professionally produced, with a distinctive look. Start it at the two-minute mark if you’re not interested in the pseudo-story presented by the video, which in the end is just a chance to get Dialekt to light a few giant flares and let a helicopter spread color around him as he raps. What matters is that the quality of the song speaks for itself. This is everything pop programmers salivate over. Will it be enough to break Dialekt here in America? I’m going to bet yes.


“I’M YOUR 911!” — Mumiy Troll’s “Swimming With Sharks” expands band’s hook-filled legacy, strongest English-language single yet

Read the “Hear! Hear!” interview with Ilya Lagutenko from last May.

It is fitting that Mumiy Troll’s latest single, “Swimming With Sharks,” builds its hook upon a surf-rock infused bass melody and a hook which catches you off guard with its insistent groove. Ilya Lagutenko’s giddy sense of pop-rock fun is catchy and makes this one of the band’s strongest singles yet, and their best by far in the English language. The video itself is pitch-perfect, proof of the band’s talent as Russia’s greatest pop export and more than enough reason to check them out if you’ve yet to take the plunge. Swimming with these sharks is all the more dangerous because there’s blood in the water, but what fun is there in always playing it safe?

Keep an eye out for the band’s 11th full-length, which they’re recording in English and Russian in between dates on their relentless touring schedule.

 


ALL YOU EVER DID WAS WRECK ME: Miley Cyrus’ “Wrecking Ball” as an examination of teenage hypersexuality

So, in the wake of the VMAs and Miley Cyrus’s unfortunate Twitter-bait bomb which was Twerking It 2013, you think she’s undeserving of any pop respect. And on first glance the video for “Wrecking Ball” stands to reiterate that. But give it a second look / listen. What, I have to wonder, is wrong with a teen sensation growing up and taking creative and artistic risks, even if it means perhaps alienating her from today’s crop of tween pop followers? Bear in mind Cyrus came to instant fame years ago and has aged alongside her audience — is there not room for a young woman to make her own moves in a male-dominated industry?

Here Miley pushes to take control of her own body, claiming her sexuality as her own as a backdrop to a song which, lyrically, crushes her beneath the memories of a relationship left in ruin. And while you may object to the video’s seemingly casual nudity and the often awkward sexual juxtapositions as Miley sings of taking to love like a wrecking ball only to be wrecked by the very love she so desires, bear in mind — she doesn’t owe you anything. Beyond giving pop fans a hook-filled melody, which this song does repeatedly and with gusto, her job as an artist in this pop era is to produce hits. And “Wrecking Ball” is a hit to anyone with ears. Whether her personal life is a mess, or her decisions as a young woman violate your personal sense of “shame,” I say resoundingly“So what?” In that case she’s probably not singing this song in your direction anyway.

All that should and does matter is the song itself. Imagine getting this single sent to your inbox without a name attached, without the baggage of the video, and listen. Better yet, load the video and then turn your screen off, then press play.

Walk around the room and listen to that plaintive opening verse, a hook unto itself. Then the chorus hits, taking the song from plaintive pop to full-on anthem. “I came in like a wrecking ball / I never hit so hard in love / all I wanted was to break your walls / all you ever did was wre-eh-ehck me! You wre-eh-ehck me!” This is everything Lady Gaga still wishes she could put out there, every inch of what Katy Perry’s “Roar” can’t reach.

Love really is war, and when you lose you spend so much wasted time blaming yourself for the failings, to the point of self-destruction. That’s where the twisted sexual imagery of the video comes to bear. Yes it’s disjointed, creepy, desperate and disturbing, but it’s a view into what many of our young teenage women grow up thinking they have to do to win in love. Robin Thicke can put out a song like “Blurred Lines” which all but endorses the “I can treat you like an object because deep down you really like it” mentality, and yet we publicly scorn only the women who take part in the video, not the men who take credit for the song itself. Miley is a slut for twerking it onstage while Robin Thick plays the role of R&B referree.

And when our sisters, our daughters, fall in love and have their hearts broken, they’re left reeling, wondering what they didn’t do that could have kept the man in their life from wrecking them. Far from glorifying young women and open sexuality, as the Guardian obliquely opines, the video implies the opposite. The whole world tells me I should be this way, how could I be the only one who’s wrong?

I never meant to start a war
I just wanted you to let me in
And instead of using force
I guess I should have let you win

What message do we send when we trash the messenger — in this case an overly sexualized music video — when the message within is that in a world where everything’s hyper-sexualized, it’s okay coming from a man but when a woman claims even a touch of that sexual power, it’s off limits? I’m sure Miley Cyrus isn’t worried too deeply about this debate as she pushes “Wrecking Ball” toward what’s almost certain to be mega-hit status. But while she didn’t write the song, she uses the video to hint at the pain and hurt which lies below both the lyrics and the nudity in her video.

All of which warrants a second listen if you’ve chosen already to write the song off as meaningless … or worse, mere filth.


LET ME SHOW YOU WHAT A HERO DOES: DNA’s “Stonewall Jackson” breathes life into pop music with epic mythmaking

Saw these guys in Tell City, Indiana during their Schweitzer Fest performance the night before they laid down this spectacular live version of “Stonewall Jackson” at a show in Illinois. I had never heard the band prior to seeing their exceptional live show, yet I was singing along with this one instantly, the kind of thing which heralds a hit hands-down.

“Make ‘Stonewall Jackson’ the single and make station managers play it at knife-point,” I wrote in a quick email to the band after the set. “They’ll thank you for it later.”  A month later I still agree. From the slow-burn guitar and keyboards opening to the frenzied chorus, the song’s got everything you need for a repeatable, ear-catching hook. And the rest of their songs fully live up to the hype, as fully laid bare on the band’s debut full-length Plenty of Thoughts.

There’s definitely plenty of room in the pop scene for a group of guys from St. Louis who have this much songwriting sense and the willingness to get out there and build a fan-base from the ground up. If you haven’t heard DNA, give the songa  listen and then head over to their Facebook page. Then sit back and let your ears thank you.


LET IT BURN DOWN: Jonny Lang’s “Blew Up (The House)” kicks the pulse of blues-pop up a notch

Though many of us could be forgiven for not knowing Jonny Lang still had a recording presence, he returns today after a seven year absence with Fight For My Soul, which contains a surprisingly catchy first single — “Blew Up (The House)”, which features a man saving his soul by burning down all vestiges of his prior life “just to watch it burn down.” The song features as crunchy a groove as the young bluesman has yet produced, coupled with a Greek chorus of vocals which reminds this critic of Star Turtle-era Harry Connick Jr.

Rest assured, once you hear this song, you won’t forget it easily. And you’ll be likely to want to seek out the remainder of Fight For My Soul, which looks to be the musical maturation of a man who’s spent half his life reveling in all things blues. If you wondered, when hearing Lie To Me back in ’96, just how good this kid would sound like with some experience under his belt, the new material quickly, assuredly answers: “pretty damned good!”

For the tour-minded among you, Lang can be spotted in Minneapolis on September 18th, to be followed by a series of shows in the Midwest and along the east coast, before he hits Europe in October.


“My Heart Hurts So Good” — AKA and the burgeoning Olympia, Wash. hip-hop scene (FREE MP3s!)

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BAND APPROVED MP3s!
Download these mp3s to hear what has Frank Cardoza so excited.
They’re all yours, all legal, ready for you to hear and become a fan!
Simply right click each link and “save as” to put them on your drive.

AKA & The Heart Hurt Goods – “Dotted Line”
(f. Double B / Nathalie Elam)

AKA & The Heart Hurt Goods – “Put On Blocks”
(f. Nathalie Elam / Andrew White  / Nicatine of Free Whiskey)

AKA & The Heart Hurt Goods – “Supersonic Love”
(f. Nathalie Elam)

AKA & The Heart Hurt Goods – “Last Call”
(f. Nicatine of Free Whiskey)

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From the land of the mighty Pacific Northwest comes the rumbling of a burgeoning hip hop community, that is uniting all things hip hop. Graffiti, Djing, B-Boying, Emceeing and a growing battle rap scene.

One of the leading emcees going by the moniker AKA, began putting together his album Heart Hurt Good together in seven years ago. Working with one of the premier producers in the Pacific Northwest Matt “Smoke” Smokovich and featuring some key players on the hip hop scene, Nicatine from Free Whiskey, Double B, Q-Storm, Skyler Blake and Brad B of Drunken Immortals. AKA added what would become The Heart Hurt Goods: Josh White on drums, Joe Pearce on rhythm guitar, Adam Bakotich on lead guitar and DJ Mothrider, and keyboardist Andrew White, and vocalist Nathalie Elam combined to form AKA & The Heart Hurt Goods.

They preceded to play almost everywhere and even tour the Southwest over the next year along the way winning Best Solo Act and Best Hip Hop Act at the Oly Music Awards and the just announced Hip Hop Freshman Of The Year in the Puget Sound. With the album Heart Hurt Good AKA has shown the passion and creative fortitude to follow his own path. From the first track “What We Do As We Do It”, the love of hip hop and Olympia flow through the entire album.

“We’re not in Kansas anymore Auntie Em” AKA flows on “Rocketman”, reminding us that this album is full of surprises and all the great things that indie hip hop can be. The stand out tracks that could bump in any club include “Dotted Line” Featuring Double B, and “Put On Blocks” featuring Nicatine from Free Whiskey and Nathalie Elam, throw a twist to the regular boring bass bumps that permeate through many misguided hip hop fans’ speakers. Tracks that bump the soul and drive anyone to start dancing in their spot, building up to throw aside the listeners’ inhibitions and get up onto the dance floor and shake.

Add in songs like “Supersonic Love” which touches on love lost and remembered and the iconic “Last Call” which ends the album with Nictaine from Free Whiskey and AKA singing the perfect song for those of us who continue to look for something else to occupy us when we’ve heard that familiar line “we don’t care where you go, you just can’t stay here.” With live instruments, flows which resemble poetry more than the false bravado that seems to reign supreme in mainstream hip hop, AKA has crafted a album with the Heart Hurt Goods that hits all the senses and easily fits into both rock fans and hip hop fans musical collection.

This is what a album for the summertime is supposed to be.

Brazilian singer / cellist Dom La Nina’s “Sambinha” brings out the smiles, requires further review of debut Ela


If this doesn’t bring a smile to your face when you wake yourself up this morning, I don’t think anything will.

Over a plucked cello melody and guitar backdrop, the talented young songwriter lays down a layer of sweetly catchy vocals, creating one of those to-the-point singles bands like Sergio Mendez and Brasil 66 used to put out back when this music had its brief heyday in America.

It’s a song worth checking out, and it makes me want to dig deeper into her debut LP Ela, out since January on the Six Degrees label. Some have likened this sound to what Cat Power might manage if produced by the likes of Brian Wilson. I’ll leave the comparisons up to you, because I only have half an hour before work and I need to hear the song at least five more times first.

Dom has been featured on WNYC’s Soundcheck Blog, KCRW’s Morning Becomes Eclectic, and NPR’s Weekend Edition and  Studio 360.   She made her US performance debut at the Make Music Pasadena festival and Hotel Cafe last weekend in Los Angeles, and returns to North America in early July, including a New York City date at Joe’s Pub. Hopefully she’ll do well and they’ll announce more dates for those of us stuck in the midwest. Until then, the recordings will have to suffice.