DREAM BIG: This Album Does Not Exist proves earworms are not dead, should put DREAMERS on the map


DREAMERS at the Irving Theater in Indianapolis (Credit: Jonathan Sanders)

clr8iolwaaabfzpWhen I saw DREAMERS perform at the Irving Theater in Indianapolis last March with the Kickback, it was the perfect storm — a show with no promotion on a sleepy Sunday night with non-stop rain and no audience other than myself and the bands. “If you ever wanted to see an entire concert just for you, this is your night!” Nick Wold joked from the stage, and while it was disappointing few saw it, the band proved from that point they were capable of putting on a great performance in any situation.

Fast-forward to the pending release of their latest album This Album Does Not Exist, due out via Fairfax Recordings on August 26th. A kinetic example of pop confections of the finest order, this album plays nonstop cool from the first notes of “Drugs,” a propulsive mix of Wombats-esque dance backdrops with vocals that echo the credible hooks of Guided By Voices, even as the overall result of the DREAMERS sound is something completely on its own plane. “Wolves (You Got Me)” is already a legitimate hit, and I’d be surprised if “Never Too Late To Dance” and “Come Down Slow” don’t soon join it on radio stations terrestrial and streaming alike.  Even having seen them live, knowing the depth of their catalog and the number of songs they already had with hooks capable of worming their way into the brain, the new album proves surprising in that there’s not a dud here.

Even in a world of single-serve pop, these songs are best consumed in quick succession with the top down and the volume at 11. Pleasure is only guilty if you make it so, and the only thing wrong with this album would be passing it up.

SLAP-HAPPY: Rockümockery delivers full unhinged Slappies experience in album form


The Slappies may seem like they’ve been rocking their way around Indianapolis forever, but that’s only because the various members of the band have played their parts in all manner of other local punk mainstays, including Smash and Grab, Gay Black Republican, and God only knows how many others. I’ve been in the city since late 2014, and I kept hearing people say I should seek them out live, and though I haven’t yet that’s soon to be rectified after hearing this album.

Though I don’t have the official first-hand evidence to back the claim, even a cursory listen to Rockümockery makes it clear these guys all know their element, and they’re comfortable in the studio as well, laying down thirteen tracks that showcase what I can only imagine is a blisteringly fun experience. “Beer Time,” “Social Retard,” “Monster Truck” and “”My Own Way” open the album on blitz of raw energy that plays fast and loose with melody and turns of phrase, daring you to look away. You won’t. Even the choice of cover material is inspired, particularly the cover of Ellen Foley’s “Torchlight,” featuring memorable guest vocals by Toni Bennett, which had me hitting repeat as I researched her contribution to the album.

Catch yourselves a Slapplies show and then grab this from the merch table afterwards, you’re sure to be looking quickly for the follow-up. The real disappointment is that this gem has been available all year and no one’s been spreading the word … well, hop on the “Hear! Hear!” bandwagon: The Slappies rock, and this album’s a keeper!

The band’s album currently can be purchased at shows  in person
and at Indy CD and Vinyl, as well as select Karma locations in central Indiana.
If out of state, hound Rich on Facebook to build a website, already!

Eddie Brnabic’s Subtle Realms a fantastically trippy excursion into instrumental rock

For those among us who appreciate the incendiary goodness of an electric guitar soloist fully unleashed, what Eddie Brnabic does with his album Subtle Realms is positively buzzworthy, particularly on “Transcendental Wine,” an intense throwdown which illustrates his ability to trip with ease between full-throttle rock and raw oozing funk. This is instrumental music built custom for the headphone treatment, and it’s worth every effort to listen to while avoiding all other distractions. Keep an ear toward this kid — you’ll hear much more from him when this album takes off. You can stream the entire album via his Bandcamp page.

Freakin’ Out The Squares by Clouder is the reason the Internet murdered gatekeepers

They came. They saw. They clouded. And while they were at it, this Brooklyn psych-rock outfit crafted Freakin’ Out The Squares, an album of supremely addictive tracks that showcase their sound, one immediately awash in jangling guitars, slightly fogged vocals and all the melodic hooks you can handle. Don’t believe me? Play “Broadcast Victim” and you’ll be a fan for life. This is the music we murdered the gatekeepers for hiding it from us! Hear all their music at http://clouder.bandcamp.com.

Angela Perley and the Howlin’ Moons’ “Hurricane” hits with the full force of a band worth knowing

With the pop kick of Rilo Kiley coupled with the hooks of Kasey Musgraves and Lindi Ortega,l Angela Perley and the Howlin’ Moons hit like a full-on tropical wave with Hey Kid and lead single “Hurricane.” This is the music you should play to friends who say there’s nothing country music can offer, while also bolstering the hooks which could fuel pop-country radio if they focused on musicians with the chops to play to classic and modern influences. Clearly these tracks showcase an artist who’s at home as a cultural observer:

Growing up in small town Ohio, Perley spent years as an observant wallflower engrossing herself in poetry, literature, people, and films. “I am a storyteller at heart, always have been. I get a lot of inspiration from relationships, surroundings, poetry, and old movies. Music for me is a way to express feelings I can’t get out any other way, and when I hit the stage with the band I can turn up and let go.”

The album officially comes out January 21st, and features more than just the single, including “Athens” and “George Stone” which help front-load the listening experience with material worthy of consistent repetition. But “Hurricane” definitely sums up the band’s sound, giving the “something real” she seems to honestly feel straight down to the bone. “You and I you know we are the same,” she howls early in the proceedings as crunchy lead guitar and thundering percussion provide a backdrop as intense as the storm in her heart. The chorus of “whoah whoahs” and stacatto “ha”s further showcases the Rilo Kiley influence, reiterating just how much of an earworm this song is.

Check it out below and then visit the band’s official website to ensure you get your copy the day of release. This isn’t an album you’ll want to miss, as these Howlin’ Moons are ones you’ll want to revel beneath well into 2014.

MELLOW GOLD: Slippertails’ There’s A Disturbing Trend sludge-rocks its way into your soul


Si, soy un perdedor, but I’m loving how much fun Slippertails are making out of my eternal nostalgia for early-90s alt-sludge.

These New Jersey-ites have soaked in everything that made Beck’s Mellow Gold and Nirvana’s Bleach so mind-bendingly addictive and they’ve put it through a punk-rock blender, creating a photocopy of their own “Garden State of Mind.” However you look at it, songs like “Hip New Jerk” require one to immediately forego the headphone treatment, instead blasting these sludgy, instantly deep-grooving tracks to the masses, demanding they pay attention.

You can stream the entire album now on the band’s Bandcamp page, and you should do so quickly, for There’s A Disturbing Trend serves to showcase just how good modern alternative music can be when you forget about trends altogether and simply rock. Now that’s a novel idea!

FIRST IMPRESSIONS: Robin Thicke and Backstreet Boys find their calling

It’s been a few weeks, so the dust has had time to settle on Kanye West and Jay-Z’s latest albums. For the sake of reviewing, I did not want to touch them because EVERYONE has to analyze and dissect these things for the real underlying message and what it means for us as a generation. That is, we the sophisticated music listeners.

It’s pretentious for someone to think they can listen to Yeezus and come away with a well-formulated analysis of society. We cannot relate to this music. Anyone who “get’s it” is lying. Here’s a random lyric: “Okay, I smashed your Corolla, I’m hanging on a hangover. Five years we been over, ask me why I came over. One more hit and I can own ya, one more **** and I can own ya.” It’s like a deleted scene from Project X. Even though some of his earlier work had this sort of late-night masquerade material, it was real. He had fought through incredible odds and was able to achieve his ultimate dream and share it with the common man in his first three albums. Then he poured his personal emotional struggles into 808s and Heartbreak, while My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy was more on the artsy side. Now we’re far past that. He is so far beyond the normal lifestyle that he can’t possibly reach us from his galactic pedestal. Aesthetically, Yeezus is superb. But, like Kanye’s persona, the album’s glossy and appealing exterior can only do so much to cover up a hollow interior. And his ego, which I find rather charming, won’t allow him to see this. There is but one other man who can relate…

Magna Carta…Holy Grail is easier to ingest. If you put “JAY Z BLUE” aside, there are two themes to the album: ‘Fame is hard’ and ‘I am famous.’ I like Jay-Z, at least I think I do, but I don’t see his need to make music right now. Judging by the Samsung marketing, this album was merely proving a point that he is better at life than you: “I can have a platinum album by GIVING it away, you bums! AND I’ll still have enough money to sign Clark Kent to play for the Nets!” It’s sickening. I still haven’t deleted that app from my phone yet, so there might be an air strike heading my way before I can hit “Send.” But in the aforementioned “JAY Z BLUE,” there’s a real heart of a man trying to be a better father than his own. Great moment. Also, note that every rapper has a daughter and a corresponding song dedicated to her. Seriously, everyone I could think of does.

I realize that those are quasi-reviews,  but here are the real ones:

Robin Thicke – Blurred Lines

It has come to my attention that until recently, Robin Thicke has not been very popular with music listeners. Ever since his A Beautiful World debuted in 2003, he’s only seen a significant uptick in popularity in his seductive “Lost Without U.” Other than that, it’s been five albums of relative silence, but I only thought that was because of the content. He cranks out some of the best modern bedroom albums out there, which isn’t a big sell for the radio. Still, I thought people were paying attention while being too ashamed to talk about it. Then this “Blurred Lines” nonsense came out and he’s back to relevance with his sixth album by the same name. It’s genius, really. Instead of the usual slow jam, Thicke took the Timberlake/Usher route and started cranking out more upbeat hits while keeping the provocative material. Justin Timberlake went a different direction with his The 20/20 Experience, so Blurred Lines is here to take it’s place with some endearing funky-smooth beats. No bedtime songs for you.

“Take it Easy on Me” sounds like it came off of FutureSex/LoveSounds, right down to Timbaland’s signature interruptions. “Get in My Way” is a throwback boogie-jam, but I’m not sure if that or “Give It to U” is the next over-played single. Regardless, we were in a mega-hit dry spell, now we have our artist of the moment. Let’s just see how long it’ll last.

Backstreet Boys – In a World Like This

In case you haven’t been keeping up, here’s a quick run-down of what BSB has been up to the past few years:

  • 2006 – Kevin leaves the band; the Boys soldier on.
  • 2007 – Release album six, Unbreakable. (One of their best albums though not widely recognized as such.)
  • 2009 – Release album seven, This is Us. (This is not them. Tried to fit into the Lady Gaga/Justin Bieber pop landscape with super-bubbly hits, which is not how BSB does business.)
  • 2011 – Leave Jive Records. (Later created an independent label called K-BAHN – an anagram of the first letters of each member’s name.)
  • 2012 – Kevin returns, legacy restored.

With full creative control on In a World Like This, this eighth studio album is what makes the Backstreet Boys the greatest boy band that will ever walk this earth. I’ve mentioned this before, but I don’t think their status atop the pop Pantheon can even be questioned at this point, no disrespect to NKOTB. They have the longevity, the talent and the integrity of a dynasty. But incidentally, I can’t imagine these songs popping up all over the radio like the BSB of yesteryear. This isn’t a record for adolescents. Much like Hanson’s new album, the mature quality of In a World Like This might be to it’s detriment, at least commercially. You get this vision in your head that a boy band is supposed to appeal to young girls with their catchy, guilt-ridden songs you can’t seem to escape. And because of who they were, it’s hard to embrace who they are, even when they have tolerable hits for a more or less universal audience. Their updated “Similar Artist” page should include Lifehouse and maybe The Calling, not so much N*Sync and 98 Degrees.

I hate it when the title track/lead single is the best song on the album, but that’s the case here. “In a World Like This” has a youthful edge while retaining BSB’s adult-alternative sophistication. So is this any kind of groundbreaking display of musicianship? Not at all. Only “Permanent Stain” and “Make Believe” stood out on first listen and the rest faded into background noise. But it was pleasant, which is more than I can say about a One Direction album. That’s how it should be for the Backstreet Boys in 2013: wholesome and sincere. They had their time to release hit after hit and do extensive touring, but being 40-years-old ruins those ambitions. The members probably prefer it this way because they have families, kids, and reasons to come home.

Reasons to sing.